Votes for change, again

In 2008, the majority of voters made it clear they wanted change. In 2010, the majority of voters made it clear during mid-term elections, they wanted change, again.

The argument can go back and forth whether voters wanted to get rid of Democrats or welcome Republicans but one thing is for sure, things were not okay with voters the way they were going.

When a job is going well, many are willing to stand with their team and take credit but when uncertainties arise and plans either drag out or changes need to be made either to existing programs or benefits in order to set a long term goal or a fix for a broken system, people start backing down, changing sides or turning away, unwilling to have their name attached to an uncertainty.

Many times, this could be understandable or even a reasonable move, but in Washington, when it comes to an elected official whose job is to make tough decisions, many times with uncertain outcomes or no immediate gratification, this can be looked at as running away from responsibility.

An elected official’s job consist of making long lasting decisions on laws, taxes, wars, healthcare, education, immigration, national security and anything that may be put on the table at any time and has to be ready to stay with a task, see it through, until it is resolved whether that means long discussions, comparisons of ideas, hearing out conflicts and finding either a new approach or compromise to resolve the differences and therefore bring a conclusion to the job that was presented. There are no promises of easy answers, but coming out with the excuse no answer can be found is not acceptable.

To be a good representative of the American people, an elected official comes down to having the desire to do the job one was elected for. They can’t hide behind their party, their values, their religion or their future ambitions. Who they are, and what they stand for is what should have brought them to run for office and get elected in the first place, and was part of their character before they were elected. It’s not something used to stall votes, hinder discussions and therefore tie down the ability for America to move forward, holding back Americans from having the ability to see the necessary solutions to the problems facing America.

With these mid-term elections of 2010 behind Americans and changes coming to Washington, let the voices of the Americans be heard. Although there have been many different sides and views to the elections, the overwhelming sentiment is voters are seeking change. The change voters are seeking is in actions more than words, in the behaviors more than the people and in the nation, a country that so desperately needs to be repaired in more ways than many in Washington have been focused on.