Proposed deficit reduction plan?

Actions speak louder than words, right? The question is, who is willing to stand behind their words now and which actions will be taken?

The nation has clearly had a problem with its rising deficit and President Obama and leaders of his deficit commission understand Americans want solutions much more than words and political maneuvering or campaign slogans.

Bipartisan leaders of the commission released a proposal Wednesday with suggested cuts and reductions estimating it could cut the deficit by $4 trillion over the next decade.

Although the full commission has yet to weigh in, there is already mounting feedback around the nation and of course, in Washington, but isn’t cutting the deficit what so many have been asking for?

Why is this causing so much of a debate? These cuts are not only looking to stop wasteful spending, fraud or end programs that are no longer effective or may be out of date. These programs are looking to make some big changes in programs that many Americans and politicians have tried to avoid making changes to.

The retirement age for social security would increase by one month every two years after it reaches 67 under the current law, meaning the normal retirement age would reach 68 in about 2050 and 69 in about 2075. There is a hardship exemption in place for those who are unable to work after the age of 62.

The proposal calls to gradually raise the gas tax by 15 cents beginning in 2013 and have these funds go toward the transportation trust fund.

There are 3 options of Tax Reform proposals; The Zero Plan, the Wyden-Gregg Style Reform and the Tax Reform Trigger. All three are after the same goals, some of which are to lower rates, simplify the code, make America the best place in the world to start and grow a business and reduce the deficit.

Other examples of cuts in the proposal include a freeze of federal salaries, bonuses and other compensations at the Department of Defense for three years. Reduction of overseas bases by one-third, slow the growth of foreign aid, cut federal work force by 10 percent and the list continues.

The commission knew their proposal would be controversial but said putting it on the table would prompt a more realistic national debate.

So, that is where it stands right now. People are speaking out. Members of the House and Senate need to speak out and have dialogue and be able to work together to accomplish a plan to bring down the deficit and although this proposal may be abrupt and harsh, the deficit is climbing and the nation is falling deeper and deeper into debt.

Instead of a country being divided, the country and its leaders should be discussing ideas and working together because although our nation has separate political parties and is a very diverse nation, we must come together and if it hasn’t been made clear enough already that being divided isn’t working, then maybe an even larger debt and a more divided group in Washington will be the road of clarity this nation so desires. But, it seems so many in this nation have already reached the point of willingness to discuss, dialogue and work together to find solutions and work with each other to move forward.

Hopefully that is the feeling in Washington as well.